iBeacon at an Art Gallery

Aside from pushing offers and discounts, Apple’s new iBeacon technology provides a whole different way at creating native location based interaction with iOS devices, and this example from Rubens House Art Gallery in Antwerp, Belgium.

With hopes to create an intricate network of digital content inside the house, Prophets positioned iBeacon sensors in just about every nook and cranny. These stand-alone sensors are battery-powered and communicates via Bluetooth. Because of its small, wireless design, Beacons can be installed without any physical intervention in the historic structure of the building.

Push notifications sent to smartphones and other mobile devices connect people in close proximity, notifying them of the stories behind different paintings and architectures. Through this app, users will have access to x-ray scans of the artwork, interactive trivia questions about Rubens and a GPS system that outlines the entire building.

Why I’m Curious:

After Apple quietly launched iBeacon at their Developer Conference last year, interest has been high for retailers and developers to explore the usage of the technology.  One of the first retailers to test out iBeacon at their stores is, of course, Apple.  The NFL also tried explore the new technology at the SuperBowl last week by pushing notifications to iPhone users at the MetLife Stadium.

The Ruben House Art Gallery’s experiment with iBeacon is one of its first implementation outside of retail stores.  The app that the Gallery implemented is a smarter and localized version of augmented reality that utilizes blue tooth technology.  It brings a deeper layer to visitors’ experience.

 

Advertisements

Share your thoughts.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s