Montblanc Worldsecond App

The Montblanc Worldsecond photo project app used a remote countdown timer to synchronize users all around the world to capture an image at exactly the same instant. Pictures from each of the sixty Worldseconds were shared together in a gallery, capturing a global snapshot of what people were experiencing at that moment.

Sixty seconds before the actual Worldsecond, the app switched users’ smartphones to camera view so they could find their subject. As soon as the countdown reached “0″, the camera took a photo automatically.

By synching each user’s app to the local time zone and using a central server based on the atomic clock, demodern was able to compensate for latency delay and achieved simultaneous captures accurate to one millisecond. The app and its surrounding campaign increased Montblanc’s Facebook Fans by 66% and triggered a 74% increase in Twitter followers in less than two months.

From PSFK

Why I’m Curious:

As brands are tasked with finding innovative ways to tell a compelling story, I think this program is a creative application of (digital) storytelling via multiple platforms (i.e., “transmedia”). Montblanc’s Worldsecond project helps build brand awareness and emotional resonance by taking the brand story and bringing the focus back to the customer story.

The photos live on a microsite where visitors are encouraged to create galleries for a chance to win a Montblanc timepiece. There’s also a Pinterest board, but it only has 8 pins. So I think the project could have been better optimized for digital/social integration. For instance, Montblanc could have chosen their top pics and featured them on a tumblr page where they could be shared. The photos could have even been strung together to create a dynamic story around their user base, and tied back even further to amplify their brand story.

The potential for brands to apply user-generated multiplatform storytelling is vast, and I think Montblanc has done a neat job of scratching the surface.

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