Diesel Uses Animated GIFs for its Latest Campaign

From PSFK:

Diesel’s latest ad campaign might make you do a double take. At first glance, the ads look like traditional, static outdoor ads, but take a second look, and you’ll notice the ads are actually subtly moving.

Shot by famous fashion photographer Steven Meisel, ‘Screen Tests‘ for Diesel’s Autumn/Winter 2012 campaign is an extenuation of the brand’s theme of ‘portraits for successful living.’ The ads feature young, contemporary models interacting in playful settings, and just as the campaign name suggests. As the ads start to move, viewers are able to engage with the models, to feel as if they are actually present watching the fashion shoot, rather than merely looking at a still ad.

The photographs have been turned into cinemagraphs—unlike their jumpy cousin the animated GIF, the movement in the photograph is more refined and subtle, confined to one distinct area. In one shot, a model exuberantly kicks her feet back and forth, while her face is fixed in the same defiant expression. In another, a model smirks as she captures a Polaroid of her still companion. You need to look closely and pay attention to each photo to be able to see that a model is kicking her feet, pointing a camera at you or swinging the mic back and forth.

With the use of cinemagraphs, Diesel is taking advantage of a relatively new photography technique; in early 2011, Kevin Burg and Jamie Beck were the first photographers to coin and use the ‘cinemagraph’ technique. Diesel’s cinemagraphs will be used throughout stores and on digital billboards this fall.

Why Am I Curious?

I am curious because this is a technique I have never seen before and despite the movement being a subtle one, I cannot help but feel like the model in the image is directly engaging with the audience and commands attention. I am also excited to see that technology is seeping into other formats of advertising – even stills or prints – and that this is giving brands new and exciting opportunities to stand out. I wonder what new ad formats these type of collaborations will lead to in the near future.

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